Future security from the past

Anyone remember a former Mac app called Little Flocker, written by Jonathan Zdziarski? I do, because I used to use it. Essentially, it was a program that would block unauthorized file access by programs and processes based on a set of rules that could be modified by the computer owner. Then something funny happened — Read More …

Equifax: Zero Fax Given

Even the most disinterested Americans are probably aware by now of what a giant bungling mess the Equifax hack was. Not only did the company fail with respect to basic security and intrusion detection measures, the way they handled the situation after they discovered or suspected what had happened was even more despicable. The good Read More …

A Little Mac Security

Ever since I’ve had broadband, I’ve been intrigued by the security implications of an always connected computer and how much goes on quietly in the background that we never see. Yeah, it’s all legit, or hopefully it is, but it also means that malware and hackers can crawl around on computers unnoticed pretty easily if Read More …

Out of the Inner Circle and into homelessness

The mid to late 80’s were a fascinating time for anyone preoccupied with computers and stories about programmers and hackers. Two books that made an impression on me during that time were Hackers: Heroes of the Computer Revolution by Steven Levy, and Out of the Inner Circle: The True Story of a Computer Intruder Capable Read More …

Error 53

People are jumping all over Apple for issuing an update to iOS 9 that is bricking iPhones with the message Error 53. The error is related to a software update that can’t finish because a Touch ID check fails. Basically Apple needs to verify that Touch ID hasn’t been tampered with, and this check is Read More …

The Key to Encryption

Yesterday NYT published an article about tech companies vs. the government on the issue of encryption, and I immediately saw Twitter blowing up with people freaking out that iMessages are stored unencrypted in iCloud. Except they aren’t. First off, iCloud is a term that covers a lot of technologies. NYT isn’t sophisticated enough to explain Read More …